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Vick's Indictment

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And now he's been banned indefinitely from the NFL, without pay. Good for them.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story?id=09000d5d801c32be&template=with-video&confirm=true' target="_blank">http://www.nfl.com/news/story?id=09000d5d8...mp;confirm=true[/post]

Good. And also I read Nike terminated his contract, too. I hope he never earns another dime.

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Vick pleads guilty to dogfighting charge

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Michael Vick pleaded guilty Monday to a federal dogfighting charge and awaited a Dec. 10 sentencing date that could send the NFL star to prison.

The plea by the suspended Atlanta Falcons quarterback was accepted by U.S. District Judge Henry E. Hudson, who asked: "Are you entering the plea of guilty to a conspiracy charge because you are in fact guilty?"

Vick replied, "Yes, sir."

Hudson emphasized he is not bound by sentencing guidelines and can impose the maximum sentence of up to five years in prison.

"You're taking your chances here. You'll have to live with whatever decision I make," Hudson.

In his written plea filed in federal court Friday, Vick admitted helping kill six to eight pit bulls and supplying money for gambling on the fights. He said he did not personally place any bets or share in any winnings.

The NFL suspended him indefinitely and without pay Friday after his plea agreement was filed. Merely associating with gamblers can trigger a lifetime ban under the league's personal conduct policy.

The case began in late April when authorities conducting a drug investigation of Vick's cousin raided the former Virginia Tech star's rural Surry County property and seized dozens of dogs, some injured, and equipment commonly used in dogfighting.

I'll still be surprised if he gets a lot of prison time (if any), although he does certainly deserve it...

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Anyone here think he'll still be able to break it back in the NFL, after all of this?

I don't think he'll ever be the same again..

With Vick admitting to bank-rolling the gambling ring, although says he never actually bet on or received any of the profits from the gambling, he was still involved in it. The NFL's player conduct policy stating the puinishment is a life-time ban from the league for being involved in illegal gambling. I don't see him ever being able to return to the league. If they did allow him to return, then they are going against that they've been trying to accomplish in actually enforcing the league's rules and regulations on the players.

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Anyone here think he'll still be able to break it back in the NFL, after all of this?

I don't think he'll ever be the same again..

He'll be a changed man. But I honestly think he'll be allowed to come back to the NFL because he is such a great talent and will be highly saught after.

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According to ProFootballTalk.com:

ESPN reports that Judge Henry Hudson has sentenced Falcons quarterback Mike Vick to 23 months in jail.

The sentence is five months longer than the 12-18 months that prosecutors recommended, and that the federal sentencing guidelines seemed to indicate.

Vick also received three years of probation, which means that he'll need to stay out of trouble for 36 months after his sentence ends. If not, he'll go back to jail.

Under federal law, he'll be required to serve 85 percent of the term, and if he behaves while in jail he'll be eligible for an early release.

That's 19.55 months, which means that Vick won't get out of jail until early June of 2009, at the earliest.

The question then becomes whether the NFL imposes a finite suspension on him after he gets out of jail. A one-year suspension would make him eligible to return to the NFL in 2010. At that time, he'll be 30 -- and nearly four years removed from playing football at the professional level.

Vick is D-O-N-E. Good ridance.

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According to ProFootballTalk.com:

The question then becomes whether the NFL imposes a finite suspension on him after he gets out of jail. A one-year suspension would make him eligible to return to the NFL in 2010. At that time, he'll be 30 -- and nearly four years removed from playing football at the professional level.

Vick is D-O-N-E. Good ridance.

If someone still wants Ricky Williams, then I'm sure someone's going to want Michael Vick.

We'll see him back.

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If someone still wants Ricky Williams, then I'm sure someone's going to want Michael Vick.

We'll see him back.

Ricky didn't go to jail and become (as much of) a public pariah.

Vick has almost made it to OJ territory. Besides, he wasn't a great QB to begin with but a great runner. When he gets out of jail he probably won't be that either.

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Vick has almost made it to OJ territory.

OJ never committed any crime ^_^

And to think the unethical treatment of dogs can penalize a person more so than the unethical treatment of human beings is revelating.

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I think 23 months is too much.. Vick probably was the least involved with all of it compaired to his partners, and yet he recives more then the two of them and most likely the third one. I hate when courts make an example out of sports stars or celebrities. I'm not saying what he did was right, but rather given the same time as his partners.. If I was Vick, I would have started early to get time off the sentance.. I don't know why so many people are happy that his career is likely to be over.. I would have loved to see him in the NFL, rather then rotting in jail.

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I think 23 months is too much.. Vick probably was the least involved with all of it compaired to his partners, and yet he recives more then the two of them and most likely the third one.

Considering that Vick bankrolled the operation, provided the location, owned the (breeding) business and then proceeded to lie about his involvement for months was what likely gave him the longest sentence. While his "friends" turned early Vick screamed innocent for months.

I hate when courts make an example out of sports stars or celebrities.

I can see that point of view. However, if you want to make a big impact on a widespread illegal activity why not make a splash. If they convicted John Johnson of Backwardville, Kentucky nobody would notice or care and it would have no impact on dog-fighting operations across the country. Now, at a minimum, the federal government has the attention of the dog-fighters out there and may have them thinking twice.

If I was Vick, I would have started early to get time off the sentance..

He tried that but the judge didn't really buy it.

I don't know why so many people are happy that his career is likely to be over.. I would have loved to see him in the NFL, rather then rotting in jail.

He's a scumbag and belongs in jail. He doesn't belong on a football where thousands are cheering for him and turning him into some sort of idol while he pockets millions of dollars and then spends those idolotary-bucks bankrolling an illegal, and inhumane activity.

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And to think the unethical treatment of dogs can penalize a person more so than the unethical treatment of human beings is revelating.

That's exactly my problem with this whole thing. Guys in the NFL, NBA, etc are committing crimes against humans on a regular basis and yet Vick has become public enemy number 1. Sure dog fighting is wrong, but seriously, is that the worst thing an athlete has ever done? Because its sure being made to look like that.

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That's exactly my problem with this whole thing. Guys in the NFL, NBA, etc are committing crimes against humans on a regular basis and yet Vick has become public enemy number 1. Sure dog fighting is wrong, but seriously, is that the worst thing an athlete has ever done? Because its sure being made to look like that.

Haha i guess we're not dog lovers.

We have athletes involved in murders at night clubs, dating under-aged women, caught with DUI, caught with possession of drugs, weapons, selling drugs to kids, etc. Meanwhile, some guy killed a couple of dogs and he's the baddest man on the planet.

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Haha i guess we're not dog lovers.

We have athletes involved in murders at night clubs, dating under-aged women, caught with DUI, caught with possession of drugs, weapons, selling drugs to kids, etc. Meanwhile, some guy killed a couple of dogs and he's the baddest man on the planet.

Well, not exactly. While he wasn't convicted criminally, OJ has been villified worse than Vick.

Also, Ray Caruth is in jail for a very long time for trying to kill his pregnant girlfriend. Also, if you look at the PFT police blotter http://www.profootballtalk.com/turdwatch.htm' target="_blank">here[/post] you will see a lot of NFL players have been arrested and convicted. Most of them, however, involve "victimless" crimes like drug possession, weapon possession, DUI (although there is a huge potential to have a victim), etc. The other distinction is that Vick is a major star in his sport and as a result it's a big story. I don't think anyone besides PETA is suggesting he's the worst person on the planet but I'm certainly going to suggest that he's a bad person who broke the law and deserves to be in prison.

I completely understand what you guys are saying though. I guess the distinction is that animals are helpless and are put into a situation without any control of the situation. Often with humans there is at least a perception that there is some control and/or input into the situation even if they are the victim. If you think the reaction to a crime involving animals is bad, just imagine the reaction if it was a crime against children. They'd want to give him the chair.

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Well, not exactly. While he wasn't convicted criminally, OJ has been villified worse than Vick.

Also, Ray Caruth is in jail for a very long time for trying to kill his pregnant girlfriend. Also, if you look at the PFT police blotter here you will see a lot of NFL players have been arrested and convicted. Most of them, however, involve "victimless" crimes like drug possession, weapon possession, DUI (although there is a huge potential to have a victim), etc. The other distinction is that Vick is a major star in his sport and as a result it's a big story. I don't think anyone besides PETA is suggesting he's the worst person on the planet but I'm certainly going to suggest that he's a bad person who broke the law and deserves to be in prison.

I completely understand what you guys are saying though. I guess the distinction is that animals are helpless and are put into a situation without any control of the situation. Often with humans there is at least a perception that there is some control and/or input into the situation even if they are the victim. If you think the reaction to a crime involving animals is bad, just imagine the reaction if it was a crime against children. They'd want to give him the chair.

I suppose i just don't see value in the life of a dog; certainly not to the extent in which a person's livelihood should be taken away because of it. Animals are animals, humans are humans (maybe African Americans aren't considered humans in the USA?).

I agree Vick should go to prison but perhaps for 3 to 6 months only and also be banned from owning dogs again in the future.

The ruling was way too harsh. Not only that but society seems determined to drive this guy's life down the hole even after he's served his time and done his due. I was listening to sports talk radios yesterday and one caller was even suggesting that he get banned for life from the NFL after he comes out of prison and that people should spit on him and treat him like he treated his dogs whenever they see him on the streets. I think that's going way too far.

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Vick wasn't convicted of only dog fighting but specifically he was "charged with conspiracy to maintain an interstate gambling enterprise, conspiracy to sponsor animal fighting, and conspiracy to transport dogs for dog fighting."

These are all Federal crimes which is why he received the sentence he did.

If the hobunk local prosecuter, Poindexter (I'm not kidding, that's his name), had taken it to trial at a local level Vick probably would have gotten something closer to what you've suggested.

Forgetting the law for a moment, let's not forget that not only did Vick conspire to kill many dogs but he also was involved in their brutal torture prior to their deaths. Most serial killers, psycopaths and sociopaths usually 'dabble' in animal torture and killing before they move on to humans.

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Vick wasn't convicted of only dog fighting but specifically he was "charged with conspiracy to maintain an interstate gambling enterprise, conspiracy to sponsor animal fighting, and conspiracy to transport dogs for dog fighting."

These are all Federal crimes which is why he received the sentence he did.

Well, ya true. I forgot about that. Everyone seems so worked up about the mistreatment of dogs that it's easy to overlook the fact that a gambling enterprise was being set-up.

Forgetting the law for a moment, let's not forget that not only did Vick conspire to kill many dogs but he also was involved in their brutal torture prior to their deaths. Most serial killers, psycopaths and sociopaths usually 'dabble' in animal torture and killing before they move on to humans.

That's going a bit too far. Maybe he was only interested in maintaining an interstate gambling enterprise and dogs just happened to be on the menu.

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I suppose i just don't see value in the life of a dog; certainly not to the extent in which a person's livelihood should be taken away because of it. Animals are animals, humans are humans (maybe African Americans aren't considered humans in the USA?).

I agree Vick should go to prison but perhaps for 3 to 6 months only and also be banned from owning dogs again in the future.

The ruling was way too harsh. Not only that but society seems determined to drive this guy's life down the hole even after he's served his time and done his due. I was listening to sports talk radios yesterday and one caller was even suggesting that he get banned for life from the NFL after he comes out of prison and that people should spit on him and treat him like he treated his dogs whenever they see him on the streets. I think that's going way too far.

IMO it's because as humans, we're supposed to be the guardians of these animals that we deem to be "pets". It's the same idea as being a guardian to a child - you wouldn't mistreat your child and you shouldn't mistreat your pet either - but I find a lot of people are more lax when it comes to the treatment of animals over children. I'm not trying to imply that they're equal, but it's really disappointing that people will treat their pets like crap when they're supposed to be the ones taking care of them because they're either not responsible enough or don't care enough but they wanted a pet "just to have a pet".

As for the sentance, 2 years is about right IMO but the justice system is clearly screwed up if this is considered "harsh".

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